'They're at risk:' Congo's taxi drivers fear Ebola's spreadJune 14, 2018 9:07am

MBANDAKA, Congo (AP) — Hundreds of people are being vaccinated in Congo's deadly Ebola outbreak, especially health workers on the front lines of the battle against the disease.

But the busy taxi drivers who might be ferrying the sick in an infected city of more than 1 million argue they are on the front lines as well and should receive the vaccine.

At least 38 Ebola cases, including 14 deaths, have been confirmed in what is Congo's ninth Ebola outbreak since the virus was first identified more than four decades ago.

This outbreak is a major test of an Ebola vaccine that for the first time is being used at the start of an epidemic after showing promise late in the West Africa outbreak that killed thousands a few years ago.

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