The Latest: Lawsuit challenges new restrictions on refugeesNovember 14, 2017 12:31am

SEATTLE (AP) — The Latest on legal challenges to President Donald Trump's travel bans (all times local):

4:20 p.m.

On the same day that a federal appeals court allowed part of President Donald Trump's travel ban to take effect, advocacy groups have filed a new lawsuit challenging the administration's efforts to restrict or ban certain refugees from entering the U.S.

HIAS, the International Refugee Assistance Project and other groups sued the administration Monday in U.S. District Court in Seattle, saying that Trump's latest efforts to restrict refugees disproportionately affect Muslim refugees — and thus perpetuate the discriminatory Muslim ban that he promised as a candidate.

Trump signed his latest executive order on refugees last month, after his 120-day ban on refugee processing expired. It imposes tight new restrictions on refugees from 11 countries that have been deemed to warrant extra screening and it indefinitely suspends a program that reunites refugees with their spouses and children. The administration says it's necessary to ensure national security.

___

11:22 a.m.

A U.S. appeals court is allowing President Donald Trump's newest version of the travel ban to partially take effect.

The ruling Monday will keep people from the six mostly majority Muslim countries included in the travel ban who do not have a "bona fide" relationship with someone in the U.S. from entering the country. Travelers who have those relationships will be allowed entry.

The ruling from the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals mirrors language from a June U.S. Supreme Court ruling on another version of the ban.

The appeals court ruled after a judge in Hawaii last month blocked the ban.

The ruling applies to travelers from Chad, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria and Yemen.

A U.S. Justice Department spokeswoman says the government will begin enforcing the policy consistent with the ruling.

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